The Best Advice from Professional Adventure Guide and Educator

Barbara Črgar

Barbara Črgar

Head of Marketing at Orioly
Head of Marketing at Orioly
Barbara Črgar

This month we’d like to introduce to you a cool consultant for tour and activity providers from Seattle, Dan Moore. And, we are more than happy to share with you this adventure guide story about starting adventure tours and activities.

In this article, you can read about Dan’s experience and pieces of advice. It will help any aspiring tour and activity provider at the very beginning of starting a tour business!

Who is Dan Moore?

Dan Moore is an experienced entrepreneur, professional adventure guide, and educator with over than 15 years of experience.  Dan is the CEO of Pandion Consulting & Facilitation, a travel industry consultancy and facilitation company based in Seattle, Washington (USA). Pandion’s mission is to raise the standards, quality, and sustainability of the travel industry.

dan moore,guide

This is accomplished through facilitating community development workshops, designing and delivering industry training, and direct consulting with businesses and destinations.

Pandion is respected worldwide for designing cutting-edge tourism education products. The team’s vast operations knowledge, including guide training, permitting, sustainability, and staff management is what differentiates Pandion from other consultancies.

Dan also sits on several nonprofit boards and is a member of the faculty for Adventure EDU, the education and consulting arm of the Adventure Travel Trade Association. He also teaches Ecotourism, Adventure Travel, and Guide Training at Peninsula College in Washington State.

Dan is the Chair of the International Adventure Travel Guide Standard.

Dan’s story: What Would I Do Differently if Starting with Current Knowledge

If you could go back in time, what would you do differently?

In 2008 I started full time helping to build and run the adventure company, Evergreen Escapes. For the prior year, I had been flirting with the idea of quitting my day job, a park ranger at a nature park in Seattle, USA, to come on board full time at Evergreen. May of 2008 I finally jumped off the cliff and made it happen.

I learned a ton over the next 6 and a half years, and I am very fortunate for the experience I had.

While there are no doubts that this was a great move, there are a handful of items I would recommend doing differently if I were to do it all over again.

There are three major areas to be aware of:

  • profitability
  • risk management
  • authenticity.

The number one thing I think everyone needs to know about running an adventure business is that it is difficult to make a profit on the outfitting/supplier side. There are lots of costs. And especially if you are in a seasonal destination. It will be difficult to manage cash flow. Many people look at the price tag for a quality adventure experience and they assume someone is making a ton of money.

“The reality is, running this type of business is not cheap.”

First, you are paying quite a bit for insurance – not something you want to skimp on. Second, for you to be able to charge a high enough price to make a living, you have to make sure that every experience isn’t just good, but amazing.

Who is primarily responsible for the success of your trip?

The amazing guide! He/she is on the front line representing your company, and quality guides are not cheap.

Second to the adventure guide are the amenities (add-ons) on your trip. Food may seem like an afterthought, but if you read reviews from top adventure companies, no doubt you will read reviews that talk about incredible food. This is a basic need identified by the researcher Maslow.

adventure guide

It is no doubt that spending some extra money getting high quality, and hopefully sustainable, food options will be rewarded.

This costs money and requires a bit more logistics. So, to increase profitability it is important to have a clear and conservative budget, price your experiences high enough that you will be able to make money to get through slow periods and have a product that is quality enough to ask for high prices.

The next recommendation is to be very aware of the risks that go into running an adventure travel company. Yes, people are signing up for your trip because they are excited about pushing them slightly out of their comfort zone. But the irony is they expect everything to be 110% safe and all variables accounted for.

This paradox requires you to have your emergency procedures locked in. Evaluate every activity on your trip to determine what risks exist.

What is the likelihood that one of those risks will become a reality?

If the probability is high and/or the severity is high, then you likely need to come up with a treatment to reduce either the severity or the probability. Once you know what risks exist, you can then build out an Emergency Response Plan to prepare for what you will do when the probability is not in your favor.

“It is not just enough to have a plan; you need to practice the plan.”

At least once a year, simulate an emergency and allow your whole staff to go through all the steps they would take to deal with an emergency. Despite all the preparation you might take to make sure that you never have an emergency, there is enough out of your hands that you will need to have appropriate insurance to cover your operation.

“Make sure your insurance actually covers the activities you are offering.”

This is a key mistake that can become a very costly mistake. Be sure to read the policy carefully. Is every activity you provide listed in your policy? Are you confident that there are no exemptions that apply to your operation? The best is to have a broker that is an expert in adventure travel to make sure that you have a professional set of eyes reading your policy.

As stated previously, your number one asset in the field is your adventure guide. It is crucial to provide solid training of your guides and staff both for safety AND quality. From the recently released Adventure Travel Guide Qualifications & Performance Standard:

“An Adventure Guide is a guide with a general knowledge of a variety of skill competencies (i.e. interpretive, medical and sustainability) required to facilitate a group of clients through a range of terrains, environments, and locales in a safe, manageable and respectable manner.”

Making sure your guides have the proper training, and fully understand your company’s value proposition is essential to fully harnessing their potential.

Another item to be aware of is to make sure you have addressed specific government requirements, and obtained permission to access the land where your trips will operate on. In the US this is sometimes not thought about until it is too late, and businesses find they are unable to obtain permits for public land.

These regulations are not always welcomed by our industry, but that doesn’t mean we don’t need to address them.

Finally, I want to encourage everyone involved in tourism to realize that we not only have an opportunity, we have a responsibility to do more than just create a “fun” experience for our guests.

The impact of flying people around the globe and inserting them into our communities is not miniscule. What about traveling can change the world? How can we curate the experiences for our guests to create a net positive for our destinations? This is the question that we should face from the inception point of our companies.

I am confident that the adventure tourism industry will not shy away from these bigger picture issues. And I know there will be many passionate individuals that will want to dive in head first to start adventure companies. Let’s work together to make sure we create sustainable businesses that are benefitting the communities we live in and the industry as a whole.

Webinar with Dan – Keep your Heads up!

This short interview is only the beginning and intro into what we plan to offer you with Dan. This fall we will invite you to our webinar with Dan!

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